Building The Perfect Beast

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Archive for the ‘OS upgrades’ tag

Apple’s OS X Server Strategy: Data Centers for Everyone

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Now we know that Lion Server will be built into Lion itself, meaning that Mac OS X Server’s code, functionality and services will be bundled with the client OS. Lion Server as a separate entity is gone, but its inclusion in Lion means that a lot more users will get a chance to try it out—either at home or in the office.

Very interesting to see how Apple is handling this. Very different from anything else we’ve seen to date. Real server software for everyman in the same box as your client OS. Pretty amazing.

Apple’s OS X server strategy: Data centers for everyone | via Macworld

Written by Jeffery Battersby

May 5th, 2011 at 9:45 am

Posted in Asides

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The Beginning of the End of OS Vaporware at Microsoft?

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Ina Fried has an interesting interview with Microsoft’s Steven Sinofsky up at CNet news. In it Sinofsky offers up what appears to be a new philosophy of development and release, at least as far as OSs go, at Microsoft:

“Everybody wants to know what’s coming and what’s next.” But, he said, talking too soon, too early is actually a bad thing that just leads to frustration.

That’s in sharp contrast to the prior version of Windows, which was first shown as Longhorn back in 2003. It ultimately suffered through numerous delays and significant changes before being released as Vista.

From the sounds of it, gone are the days of announcing an OS and its yet-to-be-nailed-down feature set years before it’s ready to be released. Which, perhaps, means that they’ve stolen another page from the Apple playbook.

Written by Jeffery Battersby

November 21st, 2009 at 7:57 am

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Marco Arment on Why Vista Hasn’t Sold Well

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Why hasn’t Vista sold well? | via Marco.org

Our industry has collectively taught average people over the last few decades that computers should be feared and are always a single misstep from breaking. We’ve trained them to expect the working state to be fragile and temporary, and experience from previous upgrades has convinced them that they shouldn’t mess with anything if it works. They’ve learned to ignore our pressures to always get the latest versions of everything because our upgrades frequently break their software and workflow. They expect unreliable functionality, shoddy software workmanship, unnecessary complexity, broken promises from software marketers, and degrading hostility from their office’s IT staff.

I’m disappointed/saddened by the last line in that quote. Disappointed that he said it and saddened that it’s probably true. But, in defense of the IT staff, it’s been my experience that the vast majority of users having problems with their home PCs also tend to vent their frustration on and blame whatever trouble they’re having on the IT staff or software supported by them, even though the problems they’re having are most often the result of their own inexperience/ineptitude. (Yes, I know that “ineptitude” is a strong, judgmental adjective to use in reference to users. Nevertheless, it’s too often true.)

Further, OS upgrades are not trivial for most users and Vista was not a slam dunk “must upgrade” from Windows XP. Having used it, I still don’t like it and don’t think that, especially for the home and small business user, it makes computing easier, especially if you’re making the transition from XP to Vista.

Written by Jeffery Battersby

October 19th, 2009 at 10:09 am

Posted in Commentary

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